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Proof Beyond A Reasonable Doubt That Women Are Better Cops, Drivers, Gamblers, Spies, World Leaders, Beer Tasters, Hedge Fund Managers, and Just About Everything Else.
Women Make Better Politicians? Less Scandalous, Certainly

Women in politics

Studies show that while there are less women in politics, they are less likely to be caught up in sex scandals than men. Women have different motivations when running for office; according to Debbie Walsh, director for the Center of American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, “women run for office to do something, and men run for office to be somebody,” a difference that affects how each gender acts once put in office.
Women who do manage to get elected then face other difficulties, mainly living up to their male counterparts. To that end, women appear to work harder, according to studies done by Kathryn Pearson of the University of Minnesota. Women introduce more bills, participate more in legislative debates, and give more speeches that open each session. There are also the standards that their voters hold them to. Celinda Lake, a Democratic strategist, says that female politicians are punished more harshly than men for misbehavior.

Of course, that isn’t to say that women aren’t completely immune from sex scandals. Nikki Haley of South Carolina dealt with accusations of adultery last year when she ran for office. Helen Chenoweth-Hage of Idaho admitted to having a six-year affair with a married man. Barbara Cubin of Wyoming was accused of “lewd pranks” when running for the House of Representatives in 1994. Studies show that while there are less women in politics, they are less likely to be caught up in sex scandals than men. Women have different motivations when running for office; according to Debbie Walsh, director for the Center of American Women and Politics at Rutgers University, “women run for office to do something, and men run for office to be somebody,” a difference that affects how each gender acts once put in office.

Women who do manage to get elected then face other difficulties, mainly living up to their male counterparts. To that end, women appear to work harder, according to studies done by Kathryn Pearson of the University of Minnesota. Women introduce more bills, participate more in legislative debates, and give more speeches that open each session. There are also the standards that their voters hold them to. Celinda Lake, a Democratic strategist, says that female politicians are punished more harshly than men for misbehavior.

Of course, that isn’t to say that women aren’t completely immune from sex scandals. Nikki Haley of South Carolina dealt with accusations of adultery last year when she ran for office. Helen Chenoweth-Hage of Idaho admitted to having a six-year affair with a married man. Barbara Cubin of Wyoming was accused of “lewd pranks” when running for the House of Representatives in 1994. But compared to the amount of men who are involved in scandals (Spitzer, Weiner, Ensign, Sanford, etc.) women seem to be steering clear of trouble.

Which then begs the question: why aren’t there more women holding office?

For more information, see this article from the New York Times.

— 3 years ago with 4 notes
#women  #women politicians  #nyt  #politics  #congress  #senate 
  1. mandownbook posted this